España puede pedir el rescate este fin de semana **ESPAÑA RESCATADA (Y a ver...)**

Cualquier tema que no tenga cabida en el resto de foros
SpitOnLinE
~/\x86
3.252 mensajes
desde nov 2003

Os recomiendo muchísimo este articulo del Atlantic, hablan muy claro de lo que esta pasando:

Europe's Fail-Out: 4 Reasons Why Spain's Bailout Is Doomed Already
Apparently, $125 billion billion doesn't buy much these days. Not even six hours of relief.

Over the weekend, Europe announced a bailout of Spain's ailing banks. It wasn't quite financial shock-and-awe, but €100 billion ($125 billion) seemed like an impressive enough sum to buy at least a few weeks -- or at worst a few days, right? -- of calm in the markets. It wasn't. If anything, things are getting worse faster in Europe. What's going on?

First, a quick recap. As Paul Krugman put it, Spain was Europe's Florida. It had a prodigious housing bubble. And now its caja saving banks have a prodigious amount of bad real estate loans on their books. But the Spanish government can't afford to bail its banks out. It can't print euros, and it can't borrow euros, except at punitive rates. We have a word for this. That word is "broke".

But Spain resisted going to Germany for a bailout. Spain feared the austere terms Germany would likely impose as part of any deal. So Spain played a game of chicken. First, it tried to get the European Central Bank (ECB) to bail out its banks instead. Germany balked. Then, it threatened eurogeddon -- memorably saying that they would not be bullied because "Spain is not Uganda" -- if it didn't at least get better terms on its bailout.

At first, it looked like Spain had won. Europe announced that the €100 billion aid package for Spain's banks would come without any further conditionality. Translation: Spain would get the money without having to do any more austerity than it had already promised to do. But then things unraveled. And fast.

The chart below from Bloomberg shows Spain's 10-year borrowing costs. Remember, the point of the Spanish bank bailout is, in large part, to reduce yields on Spanish bonds to break up the doom loop between weak sovereigns and weak banks. About that....

After briefly retreating, Spanish borrowing costs surged above 6.5 percent. That's the market giving a vote of no-confidence for the bank bailout. But the bad news hasn't stopped there. The Spanish IBEX stock index gave away a 5.9 percent increase, and finished down on the day. Italian bonds got hammered too. So did the Italian FTSE MIB stock index.

Why did markets turn so quickly from gloom to doom? The short answer: Investors are worried the Spanish bank bailout might make things worse -- and with good reason. The devil is in the details, and the Europeans have been embarrassingly short on those. Here are the four big questions that remain to be answered.

1) What's the interest rate on the €100 billion loan to Spain?

This being Europe, the term "bailout" is a bit misleading. Germany isn't cutting a check for Spain. It's a loan. European officials have promised that the interest rate on this loan is well below what Spain can borrow in the markets -- it'd better be, or what would be the point? -- but they haven't said what that rate is. It's hard to judge how good a deal Spain is getting without knowing this.

2) How much will the bailout add to Spain's debt?

This being Europe, Spain's bank bailout has a slightly Byzantine structure. The bailout funds will go to Spain's so-called Fund for Orderly Recapitalization of Banks (FROB) -- a government agency that will then inject the money into struggling banks. The Spanish government, however, backstops the FROB.

But this being Europe, this financial legerdemain doesn't really matter. The Spanish government is ultimately on the hook, full stop. So the bank "bailout" will add roughly 10 percentage points to Spain's public debt-to-GDP ratio, assuming growth doesn't collapse further. That's a big assumption.

3) Will the bailout loan be senior to other debt?

This being Europe, there are two bailout funds. There's the soon-to-be defunct European Financial Stability Facility (EFSF) and the soon-to-be online European Stability Mechanism (ESM). Spoiler alert: They're supposed to increase ... stability. They haven't exactly succeeded.

This being Europe, it actually matters a great deal whether the EFSF or the ESM loans the money to Spain. The ESM is senior to all other creditors, after the IMF. The EFSF isn't. In plain English, an ESM loan increases the odds that private bondholders will take a loss if Spain ever restructures its debt. An EFSF loan doesn't. So private investors will demand higher interest rates on Spanish bonds to compensate for the higher risk of losses if the money comes from the ESM. That's precisely what happened on Monday after European officials announced that it would indeed be the ESM making the loans.

But this being Europe, they subsequently reversed themselves. They said that the money might come from the EFSF instead -- at least at first. In the long run, it's unclear how much this would even matter. In the short run, Spain is still on the hook as a partial guarantor of EFSF loans. Um, what? The EFSF works by issuing bonds backstopped by Europe's healthy economies. But Spain can't get out of its commitment as a guarantor because its government technically isn't getting bailed out. Its banks are. So Spain would be guaranteeing a loan it's taking out. That makes even less sense than you think.

4) Will the bank bailout come with new strings attached?

This being Europe, it's not too surprising that the initial headlines that Spain was getting this money unconditionally might not be true. On Monday, German officials said that the so-called Troika of the EC, ECB, and IMF would "supervise" the bailout -- which is eurospeak for imposing more austere austerity. Still, it's unclear what this means. It's possible the Germans were talking about a previously announced agreement where European officials will reform Spain's sclerotic financial sector. But it's also possible that they were talking about further spending cuts and tax hikes.

This being Europe, it's almost impossible to say. But it's another reason for markets to worry. Troika reforms in Greece, Portugal and Ireland have knee-capped growth. And a country that can't print its own money can't pay back its debts when it's not growing. It creates self-fulfilling doubts about its solvency. It's just another reason for investors to push up the yields on Spanish debt.

***

There's a simple way to tell if the Spanish bank bailout is working. Look at Spanish borrowing costs. If they're falling, it's working. If they're not, it's not. By that metric, the 48-hour old bailout is already a clear failure.

It's easy to understand why. The bailout will increase Spain's debt. It will make Spanish debt riskier for private investors. And it might make it harder for Spain to pay back its debts. It kicks the can at the expense of zombifying Spain's economy.


Here's the worst part. It's not even clear that the Eurocrats understand the mistakes they're making. If they did, they wouldn't keep repeating them, from Greece to Ireland to Portugal, and now Spain. They're running out of time. So are we.


http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2012/06/europes-failout-4-reason-why-spains-bailout-is-doomed-already/258344/

Pero dejan un futuro muy oscuro, demasiado.
~ verum ad libertatem atque democratia ~
Imagen

elmorgul
MegaAdicto!!!
1.709 mensajes
desde may 2007
en malaga

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a4fnWlFz ... e=youtu.be

aterrador , no lo habia visto , pero es aterrrador

Crucex
Raptor
1.322 mensajes
desde feb 2012
en ACC

Ahora entiendo esa nueva ley de que manifestarse de cualquier forma estaría penado..

caren103
Ninot indultat
17.638 mensajes
desde ago 2001

SpitOnLinE escribió:Os recomiendo muchísimo este articulo del Atlantic, hablan muy claro de lo que esta pasando:

http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2012/06/europes-failout-4-reason-why-spains-bailout-is-doomed-already/258344/

Pero dejan un futuro muy oscuro, demasiado.


En resumen, que como el Euro se construyó como se construyó, no hay Banco Central real, ni eurobonos, ni nada de nada de los instrumentos que tiene y usa un banco central de verdad, y así va la cosa: a base de parches bizantinos y medidas muy locas que sólo llevan al desastre.
“Hemos tenido que luchar contra los viejos enemigos de la paz: los monopolios empresariales y financieros, la especulación, la banca despiadada, el antagonismo de clases, los beneficiarios de las guerras. Sabemos ahora que el Gobierno del dinero organizado es tan peligroso como el Gobierno de bandas organizadas”

1936, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, trigésimo segundo Presidente de los Estados Unidos.

Kwon
∂ω!
1.498 mensajes
desde ene 2012

Me ha gustado el programa de salvados.

eraser
Valar Morghulis
27.742 mensajes
y 1 foto
desde nov 2000
en Casi omnipresente

Crucex escribió:Ahora entiendo esa nueva ley de que manifestarse de cualquier forma estaría penado..

¿Y? Si la gente se comprometiera de verdad (yo el primero), nos daría igual que fuese ilegal manifestarse y estaríamos tomando las calles. Nos están mintiendo. Tenemos que ir a la prensa extrajera a enterarnos de lo que pasa en España... y nos conformamos porque Nadal ha ganado y empatamos en la Euro
Imagen

F1: Todos los años hay un ganador, pero no todos los años es el campeón


gejorsnake
Sublime ...

Staff
Moderador
18.446 mensajes
desde ago 2003
en un fiestorro...

eraser escribió:
Crucex escribió:Ahora entiendo esa nueva ley de que manifestarse de cualquier forma estaría penado..

¿Y? Si la gente se comprometiera de verdad (yo el primero), nos daría igual que fuese ilegal manifestarse y estaríamos tomando las calles. Nos están mintiendo. Tenemos que ir a la prensa extrajera a enterarnos de lo que pasa en España... y nos conformamos porque Nadal ha ganado y empatamos en la Euro


Eso es lo mas triste. Parece que en el extranjero están mas informados y preocupados por nuestra situación que nosotros mismos.

Y de los medios mejor ni hablar...

javitronik
Retrogamer.
5.992 mensajes
desde sep 2008
en Costa del Sol.

anikilador_imperial escribió:
jas1 escribió:Pero como esta todo solucionado me voy al futbol.


Yo es que prefiero irme al futbol, ver noticias asi todos los dias no afecta positivamente a mi estado de animo... prefiero no verlo.

Siempre he sido una persona informada de lo que ocurre en su pais, me encanta discutir de politica, de temas economicos, de la estabilidad del gobierno y del pais, de las leyes y medidas... pero no puedo vivir cada dia viendo como mi pais se cae. Prefiero que la caida me pille desprevenido.


Son palabras de Rajoy, ¨¿nuestro?¨ presidente del Gobierno.

Tú puedes ir donde te plazca, no diriges un país...

Rajoy no... ¨¿dirige?¨ nuestro país.
-¿Qué debe hacer un hombre, Walter?
Un hombre provee a su familia.
Si se tienen hijos se tiene una familia. Serán su prioridad, su responsabilidad.
¿Y un hombre? Un hombre provee.
Y lo hace incluso cuando no lo agradecen, ni lo respetan, ni lo quieren.
Simplemente lo soporta y lo hace. Por que es un hombre.

eraser
Valar Morghulis
27.742 mensajes
y 1 foto
desde nov 2000
en Casi omnipresente

gejorsnake escribió:
eraser escribió:
Crucex escribió:Ahora entiendo esa nueva ley de que manifestarse de cualquier forma estaría penado..

¿Y? Si la gente se comprometiera de verdad (yo el primero), nos daría igual que fuese ilegal manifestarse y estaríamos tomando las calles. Nos están mintiendo. Tenemos que ir a la prensa extrajera a enterarnos de lo que pasa en España... y nos conformamos porque Nadal ha ganado y empatamos en la Euro


Eso es lo mas triste. Parece que en el extranjero están mas informados y preocupados por nuestra situación que nosotros mismos.

Y de los medios mejor ni hablar...

¿y no te recuerda eso a nada?
Imagen

F1: Todos los años hay un ganador, pero no todos los años es el campeón


KAISER-77
Dr. Feelgood
16.179 mensajes
desde feb 2004
en Land of Confusion

La ‘operación rescate’ de la banca española tiene, en realidad, un objetivo último: salvar a la banca extranjera. El Fondo Monetario Internacional (FMI) incluye en su reciente informe sobre las entidades españolas un gráfico que revela una cifra elocuente y, en verdad, descubre la naturaleza del rescate.

La exposición de la banca extranjera a España roza ya una cifra colosal: 1,2 billones de euros. Lo sorprendente no es sólo la cantidad. También su evolución, que no ha dejado de crecer en los últimos años. Cerca de un 20% desde 2007, primer año de la crisis.

La banca norteamericana e inglesa es, de largo, la más expuesta a España. En el primer caso, con unos 300.000 millones de euros, y en el segundo con unos 200.000 millones, lo que supone algo más del 40% de la exposición total.

Las cifras son superiores a las que registró el Banco de Pagos Internacional (BIS, por sus siglas en inglés) en marzo del año pasado, que estimaba que la exposición a España por parte de bancos de EEUU ascendía a 187.500 millones, mientras que en el caso británico era de 152.400 millones. Y para hacerse una idea de lo que representan, hay que tener en cuenta que suponen cuatro veces la exposición a Grecia por parte de la banca internacional.

Ese informe del BIS precisaba que del total de la exposición, algo más de la cuarta parte, correspondía a préstamos concedidos a la banca. En concreto, 269.700 millones de euros, lo que refleja la importancia de no dejarla caer.

Entonces, la banca alemana, con 85.800 millones, y la francesa, 55.800 millones, eran las más expuestas a los problemas de la banca española, lo que puede explicar las presiones que ha recibido Rajoy para que aceptara el rescate bancario-el Gobierno lo ha 'vendido' justamente al revés-, que cubriría -en caso de llegar al máximo de 100.000 millones- cerca de una tercera parte del riesgo.

La preocupación crece en EEUU

La inquietud se ha extendido al presidente Obama, que en las últimas semanas se ha mostrado muy activo para resolver los problemas de las entidades financieras españolas. Sin duda, presinado por la banca estadounidense, que ha trasladado su precupación a la embajada en Madrid, como ha manifestado el embajador. Alan D. Solomont, en algunos encuentros en privado con representantes de la vida económica española.

El informe del FMI pone, igualmente, de manifiesto el alto grado de exposición de Brasil, México y Portugal a lo que ocurra en España: algo más de 250.000 millones de euros en conjunto.

La deuda, de hecho, es un problema cada vez más acuciante de la economía española, y según el Fondo Monetario seguirá creciendo de forma relevante en los próximos años.

Hasta el punto de que en 2017 se situará ya en el 91,9% del Producto Interior Bruto (PIB), sin contar la inyección de liquidez que recibirá el Estado para sanear el sistema financiero. Al menos, y en ese escenario -la Posición de Inversión Internacional de España –la deuda exterior neta- irá bajando, hasta representar el 84,2% del PIB en cinco años, diez puntos menos que en el momento álgido de la crisis.


Link: http://www.elconfidencial.com/economia/ ... uda-99859/


Lo que se dice, el rescate se hace de puertas para fuera, los que nos quedamos, lo sufrimos.

PrevioSiguiente

Volver a Miscelánea

¿Quién está conectado?

Usuarios navegando por este foro: No hay usuarios registrados visitando el foro y 10 invitados